Thai red fish curry

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This is one of my favourite dishes to make, and it’s really easy, especially if you get a good Red curry paste. Marks and Spencer’s is a tasty one, but I’m sure you’ll find your preference. Prepare yourself with the following ingredients:

  • 4 fish fillets, about 600g in all: This recipe was originally given to me with chicken, but Tuesy doesn’t eat animals with legs, so I tried it with fish and it seems much better. I use haddock, but you can vary it however you like. Meaty white fish works best, though.
  • 1 tsp oil
  • 3 tbsp Thai red curry paste
  • 400 ml can coconut milk
  • 300 ml vegetable stock. You can also use fish stock as long as it’s not too … you know … fishy.
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 200 g pack mixed baby corn and mangetout
  • 2 tbsp coriander
  • If you want to spice up the curry a bit (or a lot), just thinly slice some fresh green chillies (you won’t need more than one medium-sized chilli for this much curry) and add it to the stir fry.

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What to do:

  1. Cut the fish fillets into chunks. Big cubes of around 2cm is good. Heat the oil in a wok or a large saute pan. Throw in the red curry paste and cook it, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes.
  2. Add that fish and then stir-fry it in the paste on a medium-high heat until it’s browned all over.
  3. Add the coconut milk, stock, lime juice and baby corn. Bring to the boil, then add the mangetout. Reduce the heat and simmer for 4-5 minutes until the fish is properly cooked. Don’t overdo the cooking – I like to keep those vegetables good and crunchy.
  4. Sprinkle the chopped coriander (the fresher the better) over the top of the curry and serve it with steamed rice. Believe it or not, that’s all there is to it.

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Bean Fajitas

This is a delicious dish whether you’re a vegetarian or not. Obviously, you can put chicken or beef into fajitas if you prefer, but since the best bits are the spicy tomato, guacamole and sour cream, you may as well save that meaty goodness for something where you can really taste it. But I have to be honest, although this stuff is delicious, it really doesn’t photograph well, which is why I don’t have a mouth-watering image of the finished product to tempt you with. the above picture is not a full body shot, just a detail, but it gives you an idea. Just go with it and remember that even ugly messy food needs love sometimes.
Heat 2 tbsp sunflower oil in a big pan. Fry a sliced, medium sized onion for 5 mins. While that’s going on you can chop two garlic cloves, or crush them. You will need:
Half tsp hot chilli powder (I also like to throw in some freshly chopped chillis to make it extra spicy. It’s your call, though. This time, I also chucked in some red peppers that needed eating)
1tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
Add these to the onion with the garlic and fry for a couple more minutes. Then add:
1 tbsp tomato puree
400g can chopped tomatoes
Quarter pint of hot vegetable stock
Lots of beans. These should ideally consist of 220g tin of red kidney beans, 300g tin of borlotti beans, 300g tin flageolet beans. All these should be drained and rinsed. Actually, it’s just as good if you use red kidney beans and make up the rest with chickpeas. Still delicious.
Season all this with salt and pepper, bring to the boil and simmer for about 15 minutes. In the meantime, you can either:
b) Open a tub of shop-bought guacamole and spend the next 15 minutes getting in some quality time with your brand new Nintendo Wii.
You should also warm up a bunch of flour tortillas in the oven or microwave. Then, when the beans and sauce are ready, spread some down the middle of each tortilla, then dollop on some sour cream and guacamole according to your taste. Fold at one side and then fold in two other sides to form a fajita-shaped parcel. If yours are anything like mine, your fajita filling will dribble out all over the place and mess up your shirt, so take care. Grated cheddar cheese will also make your fajitas extra tasty if you can stand any more deliciousness. Serve with cold lager, preferably in a bottle with a slice of lime jammed down its neck.